Research officer interview questions

Research officer interview questions with answers In this post, let me share all of you top Research officer interview questions, job inte...

Research officer interview questions with answers

In this post, let me share all of you top Research officer interview questions, job interview strategies for Research officer position. If you need Research officer situational tips, types of interview questions for dogcare manager, Research officer interview thank you letters…, please leave your comments.

I. Top interview questions with answers


1. As Research officer, plz tell me about yourself?

It seems like an easy interview question. It's open ended: ”I can talk about whatever I want from the birth canal forward. Right?”

Wrong. What the hiring manager really wants is a quick, two- to three-minute snapshot of who you are and why you're the best candidate for this position.

So as you answer this question, talk about what you've done to prepare yourself to be the very best candidate for the position. Use an example or two to back it up. Then ask if they would like more details. If they do, keep giving them example after example of your background and experience. Always point back to an example when you have the opportunity.

"Tell me about yourself" does not mean tell me everything. Just tell me what makes you the best and fit the job requirements.

Related post: Top 10 tips to answer question: please tell me about yourself?

2. What are your career goals for Research officer? (Where do you see yourself in five years’ time?)

This is interview question about your career goals. What the interviewer really wants is to see that you’ve thought about your future, and gauge your ambition. They also want to verify that this isn’t just a stop gap position.

Although all of your answers should be tailored to the organization and position you’ve applied for, this is especially the case with this question. If you’re going for an entry level position, for example, explain how you’d like your career to progress (e.g. ‘I’d like to progress to a Senior Software Engineer’ or ‘I see myself being a team leader…’).

If you’re going for a more senior position, explain how you’d be looking to move the company forward. Have a look at their business strategy or corporate objectives before the interview, and explain how you can help in achieving them.

Related post: Top 10 career goal examples

3. As Research officer, what is your greatest weakness?

"What are your weaknesses" is one of the most popular questions interviewers ask. It is also the most dreaded question of all. Handle it by minimizing your weakness and emphasizing your strengths. Stay away from personal qualities and concentrate on professional traits: "I am always working on improving my communication skills to be a more effective presenter. I recently joined Toastmasters, which I find very helpful."

Tips to answer this question:

- Show that you are aware of your weakness and what you have done to overcome it.
- Show that you are “self-aware” and that you have the ability to take steps to improve yourself.
- Don’t you DARE answer with the cliche “I’m a perfectionist” answer or any other such answer that the hiring manager can see right through.
- Don’t highlight a weakness that is a core competency of the job. (Know the job description “inside and out”.)
- Don’t dodge this question.

4. As Research officer, what is your greatest strength?

This is your time to shine. Just remember the interviewer is looking for work related strengths. Mention a number of them such as being a good motivator, problem solver, performing well under pressure, being loyal, having a positive attitude, eager to learn, taking initiative and attention to detail. Whichever you go for, be prepared to give examples that illustrate this particular skill.

Related post: Top 10 job strength examples

5. Why did you leave your last job?

Here you will need to be careful as there are many possible answers you could use, just remember to NEVER talk negatively about any prior or current employer to a potential employer. No one wants to think that in a few years’ time you could be saying the same about them. A possible reason could be to say you were looking for better opportunities, for you to grow professionally, or you were looking for the chance to work abroad.

6. Why should we hire you as Research officer?

This is a differentiation question. What you want to tell them is: they'd be crazy not to they hire you.
Focus on them: You need to only share how you meet almost all the criteria they seek, and also have two to three additional abilities that they might not even know they need…yet. They need to know you are a candidate who can not only meet their needs now, but will also be valuable for where they want to go in the future.

Are they likely to need another skill set as they grow as a company?

Or maybe you have skills that you noticed are in another job description they are looking to fill?

You can help out with those deliverables until they find someone (or be a backup to the person they hire).

Have you been down a path already that they are currently starting? Having “lessons learned” to offer them is a very strong plus for a job candidate.

7. What is your greatest accomplishment that related to Research officer?

This is somewhat similar to the “what is your greatest strength?” question and can be handled along the same lines. You want to pick an accomplishment that shows you have the qualities that the company puts value in and that are desirable for the position you’re interviewing for.
The fact is you may have several accomplishments you could pick from. Pick one that will have the most impact.

Tips to answer this question:

- Talk about an accomplishment that exhibits how you will be a perfect fit for the company and for the position you’re interviewing for.
- Try and show some genuine passion when you’re talking about your accomplishment.
- Don’t fall into the trap of thinking your accomplishment is “too small”. The fact is, relating a small accomplishment that is inline with “what the company values” can be more powerful than an unrelated accomplishment.

8. What experience do you have in this field/Research officer position?

Hopefully if you're applying for this position you have bags of related experience, and if that's the case you should mention it all. But if you're switching careers or trying something a little different, your experience may initially not look like it's matching up. That's when you need a little honest creativity to match the experiences required with the ones you have. People skills are people skills after all, you just need to show how customer service skills can apply to internal management positions, and so on.

9. What are your salary expectations?

When completing your preparations for the interview, always have this question in the back of your mind.

Have a look at the average salary for someone in this industry, area, and who possesses similar skills to yourself, and you should get a basic idea.

But remember: this is only the first interview. You haven’t been offered the job. There’s no need at this stage to be try and begin negotiations. Giving a broad salary range will usually be enough to move on, but be prepared to back it up if you need to.

Just don’t be tempted to sell yourself short. If you’re not sure where to start, take a look at our average salary checker.

Right answer: A broad (but realistic) answer e.g. ‘I‘m looking for a starting salary somewhere between £25,000 and £30,000’

Wrong answer: ‘I’m not sure. How much are you on?’

10. Do you have any questions?

Around 75 percent of job seekers will say “Nope, I think that’s everything” to this question. Terrible response.

This question gives you a fantastic opportunity to stand out from the crowd and show your knowledge and passion for the company or organization you are interviewing for. Always have a few questions prepared and have one based around something you found during your company research phase.

Tips to answer this question:

- Focus your questions on the company and what you can do for them.
- Ask about something you’ve discovered in your company research. This will show your passion and knowledge of the company.
- Ask if there is any reason the hiring manager wouldn’t hire you. (This can be a little daunting to ask BUT can really pay off. It allows you to address something they may be thinking in their head but haven’t brought up.)
- Never say “No, I think I’m good.” Always have questions ready!
- Don’t focus your questions on yourself and what you can get from them. (i.e.
- Don’t ask questions that you could easily find the answer to.
- Don’t ask about time off and benefits too early in the process.
- Don’t ask how soon you can start applying for other positions in the company.

II. Job interview tips for Research officer position


Tip 1: Do your homework

You'll likely be asked difficult questions during the interview. Preparing the list of likely questions in advance will help you easily transition from question to question.

You'll likely be asked difficult questions during the interview. Preparing the list of likely questions in advance will help you easily transition from question to question.

Spend time researching the company. Look at its site to understand its mission statement, product offerings, and management team. A few hours spent researching before your interview can impress the hiring manager greatly. Read the company's annual report (often posted on the site), review the employee's LinkedIn profiles, and search the company on Google News, to see if they've been mentioned in the media lately.

Tip 2: Overcome “job interview nervous“

Job interview nervous is one of the first reasons why you fail in job interviews.

Related post: 10 ways to overcome job-interview nerves

Tip 3: Do-It-Yourself Interviewing Practice

There are a number of ways to prepare for an interview at home without the help of a professional career counselor or coach or a fee-based service.

You can practice interviews all by yourself or recruit friends and family to assist you.

Tip 4: Dress for Success

Plan out a wardrobe that fits the organization and its culture, striving for the most professional appearance you can accomplish. Remember that it's always better to be overdressed than under -- and to wear clothing that fits and is clean and pressed. Keep accessories and jewelry to a minimum. Try not to smoke or eat right before the interview -- and if possible, brush your teeth or use mouthwash.

Tip 5: Arrive on Time for the Interview -- and Prepared for Success

There is no excuse for ever arriving late for an interview -- other than some sort of disaster. Strive to arrive about 15 minutes before your scheduled interview to complete additional paperwork and allow yourself time to get settled. Arriving a bit early is also a chance to observe the dynamics of the workplace.

The day before the interview, pack up extra copies of your resume or CV and reference list. If you have a portfolio or samples of your work, bring those along too. Finally, remember to pack several pens and a pad of paper to jot notes.
Finally, as you get to the offices, shut off your cell phone. (And if you were chewing gum, get rid of it.)

Tip 6: Bring examples of your work

Use the power of the printed word to your advantage. As an executive recruiter, I can’t tell you the number of times I’ve been called by a hiring manager after an interview, and told how impressed they were with one of my candidates who brought examples of their work.

Most job seekers fail to do this in preparing for a job interview. This one job interview tip alone will set you apart from other candidates.

Idea: Some job seekers bring a copy of their most recent written evaluation to the interview. Obviously, you should only do this if your evaluation is outstanding.

The power of the printed word applies here as well. If you share your strengths with your interviewers, it's duly noted. If one of your bosses said those same things about you...it's gospel.
Another great example of your work is any chart or graph that illustrates specifically how you saved the company time or money...or how you made the company money.

Tip 7: Ask questions

Do not leave the interview without ensuring that you know all that you want to know about the position. Once the interview is over, your chance to have important questions answered has ended. Asking questions also can show that you are interested in the job. Be specific with your questions. Ask about the company and the industry. Avoid asking personal questions of the interviewer and avoid asking questions pertaining to politics, religion and the like.

Related post: Top 10 interview questions to ask employer

Tip 8: Follow up and send a thank-you note

Following up after an interview can help you make a lasting impression and set you apart from the crowd.

Philip Farina, CPP, a security career expert at Manta Security Management Recruiters, says: "Send both an email as well as a hard-copy thank-you note, expressing excitement, qualifications and further interest in the position. Invite the hiring manager to contact you for additional information. This is also an excellent time to send a strategic follow-up letter of interest."


Post a Comment

emo-but-icon

Follow Us

Hot in week

Recent

Comments




Top 12 ways to make money 2017











Top 14 job interview tips

Side Ads

Text Widget

Connect Us

item